B

CH K2 Treat the client and give guidance on self-help (Kinesiology)

Overview

This standard describes standards for planning, implementing, monitoring and reviewing programmes of kinesiology for clients. It includes giving guidance on methods of self-help to supplement or succeed treatment. The actions which the practitioner takes should be planned and evaluated with the clients concerned. This standard applies to any practitioner whose work aims to enable clients to improve and maintain their health, effective functioning and well-being through kinesiology and through educating them towards a self-help procedure. It covers treatment and guidance given by the practitioner wherever they practice. The clients may be seeking to improve their health, effective functioning and well-being. Equally they may have no particular health needs or may have acute or chronic conditions, or be terminally ill. They may be new to kinesiology, new to the practitioner, established in that the practitioner has been working with them for some while or returning to the practitioner after a period of absence.

This standard is based on the premise that for treatment and for advice on self-help to be effective the practitioner needs to understand the context of the client and the holistic nature of health, effective functioning and well-being. The practitioner must be able to communicate effectively with clients and any companion(s) of the client and integrate their work with that of other practitioners. Practitioners should actively encourage their client to take responsibility for their own health, effective functioning and well-being, particularly through use of self-help either to supplement or to succeed the complementary healthcare given.

Users of this standard will need to ensure that practice reflects up to date information and policies.

Version No 1

Knowledge and Understanding

You will need to know and understand:

  1. the professional standards and code of conduct for your discipline
  2. the role of the professional body setting the rules and ethics of your discipline
  3. the rules, ethics and codes of conduct of your profession and how they apply to your own practice
  4. why it is important to keep your understanding of professional rules and codes of conduct up to date
  5. how to balance your own responsibilities as a professional with any contractual or other requirements of any organisation within which you work
  6. current relevant health and safety legislation and how it applies to your own work role
  7. legislation relating to obtaining, storing and using information and supplying services
  8. the importance of keeping your understanding of legislation up to date
  9. how relevant legislation impacts on your own work
  10. the roles and functions of the principal agencies with whom you work
  11. sources of information within the health and social care sector and how to access them
  12. why it is important to respect the rights of clients
  13. the extent of your own remit as a practitioner and the limits of your responsibilities
  14. how your own role relates to that of other professionals within the principal agencies with whom you work
  15. the organisational requirements and restrictions relating to the use of resources
  16. the range of resources and options available to meet the client’s needs
  17. how to achieve effective communication through observation, sensitive questioning and listening
  18. how to adapt vocabulary, pace and tone of speaking to meet the needs of the client
  19. what forms of verbal and non-verbal communication are available and how to use these positively
  20. how to check understanding with the client by reading and using a variety of signals
  21. how to position self and client to encourage communication
  22. how to recognise and overcome barriers to communication
  23. why certain environments can inhibit communication and how to minimise this
  24. why it is important to encourage the client (and any companion(s)) to ask questions, seek advice and express any concerns
  25. the nature of a professional relationship and how to develop it with clients the need for, and how to use, inter-personal skills when communicating with the client
  26. how to respond to conflicting advice which clients may receive from different practitioners
  27. why it is important to reflect on your own practice and identify any development needs
  28. how to evaluate the effectiveness of your own actions and learn from experience
  29. the information available on effective complementary healthcare and how to evaluate and use this information within your own practice
  30. how the models and concepts in your area of practice have evolved and developed, how they tend to change with time and the similarities and differences between different versions
  31. how to develop links with other healthcare providers and the protocols for doing this
  32. how to acknowledge the limits of your own knowledge and competence and the importance of not exceeding these
  33. the importance of recognising and maintaining the client’s right to confidentiality
  34. how to balance the client’s rights against your responsibility to others
  35. what to take into account when passing on information about clients
  36. what the procedures and requirements on confidentiality, security and transmission of information are for your organisation and for any other organisation that you may need to contact regarding a client
  37. the ways in which confidentiality may be breached and how to prevent this occurrence
  38. what is meant by “implied” and “informed” consent and the circumstances in which these may arise
  39. the guidance given by your professional body on implied and informed consent and when written consent should be obtained
  40. why it is important to ensure that clients have been given sufficient information to give or refuse consent
  41. who holds responsibility for gaining consent and when this should be done
  42. how informed consent may be obtained from clients who are unable to give the consent themselves and who has the right to give this consent
  43. how to confirm that the agreements reached are likely to be in the clients’ best interest
  44. what the policies on consent, including any specific requirements under contractual agreements are for your organisation and for any other organisation that you may need to contact regarding a client
  45. why it is important to protect client confidentiality
  46. how to keep records to protect confidentiality and security of information
  47. how to keep records so that an audit can be undertaken
  48. why it is important to record all the necessary information in a format suitable for further use
  49. who has the right of access to information held on records
  50. why it is important to acknowledge and respect an individual’s rights and dignity and ways of doing this
  51. what circumstances may indicate a need for the presence of a third party
  52. who may act as a companion for the client and how to interact with them
  53. what your legal and ethical responsibilities are in relation to the client’s health and safety
  54. how to maintain your practice in line with health and safety legislation
  55. how to be supportive to the client (and any companion) whilst managing time effectively
  56. how to obtain information on commonly encountered diseases, drugs and their side effects
  57. the concept of health, effective functioning and well-being that is consistent with the practice, principles and theory underlying your discipline
  58. why it is important to recognise that the client’s previous and present care may affect their health, effective functioning and well-being
  59. how the psychological and emotional balance of the client may affect their health, effective functioning and well-being
  60. how to recognise when the body is in health balance and when it is not functioning as it should
  61. how signs and symptoms may be suppressed or altered by other factors such as medication, exercise, diet
  62. how the client’s diet, lifestyle and emotional state can affect their health, effective functioning and well-being
  63. how the physical, social, emotional and economic context in which people live affects their health, effective functioning and well-being
  64. how personal beliefs and preferences affect how clients live and the choices they make
  65. what resources are available to clients to make changes to the context in which they live and make choices about their lifestyles
  66. the nature of illness and the impact this may have on a client’s health, effective functioning and well-being
  67. why it is important to recognise conditions which may pose a serious risk to the client and when to seek immediate help or advice from other professional sources
  68. the nature of disability and your role in working with those who have disabilities
  69. how an individual’s abilities and disabilities may affect the nature and form of support and manner in which you provide it
  70. the history, principles and development of kinesiology from the original research by Dr. George Goodheart to the present day
  71. how to recognise when kinesiology may be a suitable healthcare option for the client
  72. how to recognise when kinesiology may complement other healthcare which the client is receiving
  73. how to recognise conditions for which the discipline is incomplete in itself and for which the client should seek advice from other sources
  74. the circumstances when you may choose not to accept a client:
    1. kinesiology is unlikely to succeed
    2. the client does not want kinesiology
    3. you do not wish to provide treatment
  75. the circumstances when you must not accept a client:
    1. kinesiology is contra-indicated
    2. you do not have the requisite experience or expertise
    3. other healthcare should be sought
  76. the range, purpose and limitations of different methods, which may be used for different clients with different needs
  77. how to determine the most appropriate method(s) for different clients and their particular needs
  78. how to tailor treatment appropriately for each individual
  79. how to judge whether self-help procedure(s) is/are appropriate for the client
  80. the structure, function, location and interaction of; cells, tissues, glands, organs and systems
  81. the structure and function of the skeletal system
  82. the types, classification and structure of joints: range of movements
  83. the structure and function of muscles, including types of muscles (voluntary, involuntary, cardiac)
  84. the definition of origin and insertion of muscles
  85. the origin, insertion and actions of the major muscle groups
  86. the functional interaction of muscles
  87. muscle tone and how and why it can vary
  88. muscle fatigue: the causes and recognition
  89. the structure and function of the following:
    1. cardio vascular system
    2. lymphatic system
    3. nervous system
    4. endocrine system
    5. digestive system
    6. respiratory system
    7. urinary system
    8. reproductive system
    9. immune system
    10. the skin
    11. cells and tissues
    12. glands and organs
  90. the interdependence of the body systems
  91. the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system
  92. the role of digestive enzymes
  93. the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids
  94. the function of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, essential fatty acids, antioxidants and phytochemicals
  95. the role of water and fibre
  96. food combining and acid/alkaline balance
  97. anti-nutrients: sugar

Performance Criteria

You must be able to do the following:

  1. ensure that information about the client is sufficient to plan the treatment
  2. explain the available treatment options which meet the client’s circumstances, identified needs and their personal beliefs and preferences
  3. encourage the client to take responsibility for their own health, effective functioning and well-being
  4. discuss the treatment and potential outcomes with the client, check their understanding and support them to make informed choices
  5. agree the location and timing of the treatment and make the necessary arrangements
  6. explain how the treatment and self-help programme will be evaluated and reviewed
  7. determine issues of confidentiality with the client and confirm their agreement
  8. record the agreed treatment and self-help accurately, and in sufficient detail to meet professional requirements
  9. obtain the consent of the client to proceed
  10. interact with any companion(s) of the client in ways that are appropriate to the needs of the client and to your needs
  11. ensure that the complementary healthcare environment is appropriate for the client and their needs
  12. present a professional appearance and be prepared and fit to carry out the complementary healthcare
  13. ensure that any equipment, materials, and surrounding work area meet professional codes of practice, legal and organisational requirements
  14. position the client for effective access and to minimise risk of injury to self and to give as much comfort as possible to the client
  15. reassure the client and encourage them to relax and interact as they wish
  16. carry out the treatment safely and appropriately as indicated by muscle testing, muscle monitoring and/or observation
  17. make appropriate adjustments to the treatment to meet the client’s changing needs
  18. explain the treatment, if appropriate, as it is carried out
  19. respond effectively to deal with reactions to the treatment
  20. check the client’s well-being throughout the treatment and give reassurance where needed
  21. offer clear and accurate advice and support to the client to deal with reactions
  22. ensure the client is fit to travel before they leave the premises
  23. ensure that the work area is appropriate for the client and their needs
  24. present a professional appearance and be prepared and fit to advise and educate the client
  25. clarify and agree the client’s understanding of their role and responsibilities in relation to learning the self-help procedure(s)
  26. explain the recommended self-help procedure(s) and actions to be taken by the client and the potential consequences of not following the advice
  27. check the client’s understanding and use of the recommended self-help procedure(s)
  28. inform the client of the range of possible outcomes of using the self-help procedure(s) and the appropriate actions to take
  29. respond to questions and concerns of the client and offer appropriate advice
  30. encourage the client to seek further advice if they have concerns whilst using the self-help procedure(s)
  31. acknowledge the rights of the client not to adopt your recommendations
  32. encourage the client to note the effects of using the self-help procedure(s) in sufficient detail for use in any review
  33. discuss the outcomes of the treatment and the self-help actions in a manner, level and pace suited to the client and any companion(s)
  34. encourage the client to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment and self-help actions and suggest possible modifications
  35. make appropriate adjustments to the treatment and self-help actions to meet the client’s changing needs
  36. agree future treatment and self-help actions with the client
  37. encourage the client to take responsibility for their own health, effective functioning and well-being
  38. advise the client where kinesiology is unsuitable and support them to seek other healthcare where appropriate
  39. obtain the client’s consent if confidential information needs to be passed on
  40. interact with any companion(s) of the client in ways that are appropriate to the needs of the client and to your needs
  41. record the outcomes of the review accurately and in sufficient detail to meet professional requirements
  42. store the records securely
  43. evaluate the experience you have gained from treating the client to inform future practice

Additional Information

This National Occupational Standard was developed by Skills for Health.

This standard links with the following dimension within the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (October 2004):

Dimension: HWB3 Provision of care to meet heath and wellbeing needs
CH K2 Treat the client and give guidance on self-help (Kinesiology)
Final version approved June 2010 © copyright Skills For Health
For competence management tools visit tools.skillsforhealth.org.uk
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